What does Jackson say the advantages of Indian removal will be for the federal and state governments?

What does Jackson name as the advantages of the Indian Removal Act for the United States? Native American removal would reduce conflict between the federal and state governments. … He also says that removing Native Americans from Alabama and Mississippi would allow those states to grow in wealth and power.

What did Jackson say about Indian Removal?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

What does Jackson say are the benefits to the Cherokee Nation?

A letter from President Andrew Jackson to the Cherokee Nation about the benefits of voluntary removal, March 16, 1835. … Jackson argues that the Cherokee people will be much better off if they remove to land west of the Mississippi River.

What benefits of Indian Removal Does Jackson describe?

What does Jackson name as the advantages of the Indian Removal Act for Native Americans? By separating them from whites, Native Americans would be free from the power of the U.S. government. He believes it would allow their tribes to live according to their own ways in peace, thus reducing their decline.

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What were the effects of the Indian Removal Act?

Intrusions of land-hungry settlers, treaties with the U.S., and the Indian Removal Act (1830) resulted in the forced removal and migration of many eastern Indian nations to lands west of the Mississippi.

Why did Andrew Jackson want to remove the Cherokees?

Elected president in 1828, Andrew Jackson supported the removal of American Indians from their homelands, arguing that the American Indians’ survival depended on separation from whites. In this 1835 circular to the Cherokee people, Jackson lays out his case for removal.

What does Jackson promise the Cherokees?

After the battle, Jackson tells the Cherokee chief Junaluska, “As long as the sun shines and the grass grows there shall be friendship between us, and the feet of the Cherokee shall be toward the East.” But soon Jackson will rise to national political leadership and reverse his policy, setting the stage for the forced …

How did the Cherokee respond to the Indian Removal Act?

From 1817 to 1827, the Cherokees effectively resisted ceding their full territory by creating a new form of tribal government based on the United States government. In response, the Cherokees took legal action to try to save their lands. …

Who benefited from the Indian Removal Act?

Most white Americans supported the Removal Act, especially southerners who were eager to expand southward. Expansion south would be good for the country and the future of the country’s economy with the later introduction of cotton production in the south.

How does Andrew Jackson defend his Indian removal policy?

He declared that the only hope for the Southeastern tribes’ survival would be for them to give up all their land and move west of the Mississippi River. Jackson warned the tribes that if they failed to move, they would lose their independence and fall under state laws. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress.

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Was the Indian Removal Act successful?

The Indian Removal Act of 1830 was approved and enforced by President Andrew Jackson. In the years leading up to the approval of the Indian Removal Act, Andrew Jackson was a main advocate for the cause. … He successfully negotiated nine out of the eleven main treaties that forced relocation.

Why is the Indian Removal Act important?

On March 28, 1830, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, beginning the forced relocation of thousands of Native Americans in what became known as the Trail of Tears. … Native Americans opposed removal from their ancestral lands, resulting in a long series of battles with local white settlers.